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5 Questions Upperclassman Should Ask Advisors

5 Questions Upperclassman Should Ask Advisors

Ask away - don't let anything stand between you and graduating!

Elizabeth Hoyt

February 11, 2014

We get it, you’re a college upperclassman and you know what you’re doing. You may think you know the answers…but, then again, you may be wrong.

These five questions are worth asking your academic advisor, if for no other reason than to double-check you’re on the same page.

Asking the five following questions simply ensures you’ve crossed your “t’s” and dotted your “i’s” so that nothing stands between you and that glorious graduation date.

How many more credits do I need to complete before graduation?

It may seem like common sense, but more students fail to keep track of their progress towards graduating than you’d think. You’ve likely kept track of courses within your major; however, you want to have your advisor double check to ensure you don’t miss any academic requirements, general or otherwise.

Am I looking at graduating on time?

Knowing an estimated graduation date will allow you to plan whether or not you should be taking on heavier course loads in order to graduate sooner than later. Or, inversely, there’s no sense in piling on too many courses each semester if you’re ahead of the four-year mark.

Does my major require me to complete an internship in order to graduate?

While it’s generally a good idea to complete an internship to gain real world job experience before you graduate, some academic programs require that students complete an internship before they are able to graduate.

Make sure you know whether yours is one of those programs, so that you’ll be able to plan ahead and secure an internship – if you need one.

What’s the recommended course load between my major classes and other requirements?

This course breakdown will depend on your previous credits and what you have left to complete. For example, if you mainly have major courses left, that number will be higher.

It’s always a good idea to balance your course load so that you have a little bit of everything, rather than all extremely difficult courses that are core to your major.

Which elective courses fall under my curriculum plan and complement my career interests?

If you really want to take an elective course just because it sounds interesting, go for it. But, taking elective courses that coincide with your career is also a very strategic decision.

It may give you that added edge in the workplace when you’re the one that’s proficient in a skill that others haven’t acquired yet.


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