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The Reality of Senioritis

The Reality of Senioritis

Senioritis is no joke—it is a very real and debilitating illness.

Jamie Vincent

December 04, 2013

Senioritis. As a naïve underclassman, I used to think it was a figure of speech.

As in—You didn’t do your homework? Must be senioritis.

Upperclassmen tried to warn me about it in their farewell speeches: And to all those juniors out there, beware of senioritis.

I took it as tongue-in-cheek.

But senioritis is no joke—it is a very real and debilitating illness.

For me it set in early, about halfway through the first marking period. The first symptom was an unusually high level of laziness. It became an effort to force myself to complete my homework; whereas I used to finish my work by dinnertime, I now wasn’t starting it until eight or nine o’clock at night.

This laziness soon developed into a full-fledged lethargy. It was now an effort to make myself care about finishing my homework.

Do my work during study hall? Sleeping sounded like a better idea.

Did I miss work when I was absent? Oh well. I was having enough trouble juggling college applications and extracurricular duties; high school seemed overrated.

It took a few weeks for me to admit I had a problem; luckily, my diagnosis came in time for me to salvage my first quarter grades.

As there is little support for the theory of senioritis within the medical community, I would like to offer my own home remedy for the illness.

Treatment Options and Cures for Senioritis:

1. Admit you have a problem. Denial is of no help to you here. Are you struggling with excessive laziness, lethargy, or indifference to your high school performance? The first step to solving a problem is admitting there is one.

2. Meditate. Sit in silence, close your eyes and picture two distinct futures. In the first future, you graduate with all honors and are accepted into your dream school with a full tuition scholarship. In the second future…well, you don’t. Hopefully this exercise will help to motivate you.

3. Organize.There’s a reason Spring Cleaning comes after the winter. Reorganizing can help to refresh and reenergize you after a long spell of inactivity. Make a list of all your procrastinated tasks, number them in order of priority—and then figure out exactly when you’re going to accomplish each task.

4. Accomplish. Follow through and actually accomplish each task. This will likely be the most difficult phase in your treatment of senioritis—and you may be tempted to fall back into your old ways. Step 2 may be helpful in such a scenario; compare the visuals of failure and success and realize that only one can ever be the result of senioritis.

And remember, it takes three weeks to form a habit, but only one moment to break it!


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