College Prowler $2000 No Essay Scholarship - Appy Now!
Print

Student Life >> Browse Articles >> Student Contributors

+13

Be Kind, Pay On Time: Going Through the Registration Shuffle for College

Be Kind, Pay On Time: Going Through the Registration Shuffle for College

Kyiara shares her advice for registering and preparing for class with a limited amount of stress.

By Kyiara Griffin

January 17, 2012

I hate this time of the year, and it is not because taxes confuse me. For American students, it is time to register for classes again, which means lines, paperwork, and money. All three of those are problem areas, but no more! This year, I conquered registration.

Advising

The first step in choosing classes is meeting with an advisor, so I scheduled an appointment… with my professor. At most universities, your advisor will be a faculty member who has received advanced degrees in your area of study. My advisor, like my advisor at a previous university, teaches some required courses for my major.

We met in her office during a lull between classes.

“So, what courses do you want to take?”

I pulled out a chart. Most of the schedule-planning is up to the student: the advisor is just there to, well, provide advice. The advising session also goes faster if the student is prepared. Please note that not all students bring charts: I just like making charts. “Well, as we both know, I will be here an extra year. I think I can do something with that time.” A second chart magically appears on her desk from my bag.

She glances between the two. “A double minor? That… works. It works. Have you decided when you will take ENGL____?”

“I did. If we move that to the spring of 2013, then it should pan out okay.”

Read more advice from our Student Contributors now.

After talking about the new course load, we locked in on five classes for this semester. Choosing the right classes during advising is important, because some colleges charge fees for changes. Fortunately, as a future super senior, I dream about arranging my schedule during registration.

Plans made and schedule arranged, I gathered the forms for the registrar’s office.

The Registrar’s Office

I should have been in a line to the registrar’s office, but I was not. This year, I was allowed to register online. In such a case, you simply consult the forms filled in with the advisor, officially sign up for your classes on the school’s webpage, and enjoy not standing in line.

While I was sitting in my pajamas (which I am apt to wear when not in class, at work, or standing in lines), I checked on my financial aid information. Because my financial aid exceeded the amount my classes would cost, I did not need to make a payment plan and take out anymore loans (with the promise of my firstborn child). It also meant that I could skip the financial aid office on the quest towards becoming enrolled.


Discuss this article on Facebook