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Get to the Point – and Win Scholarship Judges Over

Get to the Point – and Win Scholarship Judges Over

Be directive in your writing approach.

By Ryan Uricks

March 04, 2009

Aside from any special essays, there are a few subjects that should always be in your scholarship essay.

Your financial situation. You’re asking for money, so be honest of your situation. On the other hand, don’t turn it into a sob story unless it really, truly is a sob story.

Background and accomplishments. The scholarship committee wants to know about you and you should tell them all the good things about you. Perhaps throw in a few flaws to really shake things up.

Your hopes and dreams. What do you plan to do in college and beyond? The committee wants to know they’re investing in someone who put their money to good use and use their education as an opportunity for personal growth.

When you first sit down to write your essay, just write. Don’t second guess yourself just yet; there will be ample time to do so in the editing stage. Right now, you should get every idea or statement down on paper. After you’re finished writing your essay, you’re really only half-way done.

Now comes the editing.

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