5 Interview Questions for the Interviewer

Questions that will impress during the job interview.

By Kathryn Knight Randolph

November 26, 2014

5 Interview Questions for the Interviewer 5 Interview Questions for the Interviewer

Whether you’ve never interviewed for a real job or you’ve done it a dozen times, there is a point – usually at the end – when the interviewer asks if you have any questions for them. Typically, your response may be “no” as the interviewer has done a great job highlighting the tasks of the job, the pay rate, other benefits, etc.

But nowadays, this part of the interview is judged just as crucially as the answers you give to their questions. Many more employers are using this component of the interview to gauge your interest and determine what kind of employee you’ll be – a real go-getter or someone who just occupies a seat in the office.

Armed with these questions from TIME.com, you’ll not only prove you’re a great interviewee but that you’re ready to tackle this job.

1. How does this role contribute to the company?

This question not only provides you with some context for the job to which you’re applying, but it also identifies paths that you can take to move up in and through the company. The interviewer will most likely provide some insight into which teams you work with and how this impacts the company on a broader spectrum.

2. Who will I be working with?

Depending on how the interview is going and whether or not you’ve met anyone else on the team, you may ask this question in order to meet the other team members. If that’s not in the cards, you can still use this question to get an idea of the personalities and roles with whom you’ll be working. TIME suggests using Tom Gimbel’s “airplane test,” i.e. someone you can sit next to on a long flight, in order to determine whether or not this team of individuals and dispositions is right for you.

3. What are additional skills that are required to do this job well?

Chances are, if you’re interviewing for the job, you have the skills necessary to perform the job on a basic level, but employers are looking for more. They don’t want someone that can fill the role; they want someone who can make an impact in that role. By asking this question, you’ll get a truer sense of what the team and managers are looking for in a new hire.

4. What do you expect from me in a month, three months and a year?

It would be a disadvantage to both you and the employer if you took a job in which you weren’t able to perform and had to leave a few weeks later. With that in mind, ask this question to get a sense of the company’s expectations. Can you meet them, honestly?

5. What is your mission?

Again, this isn’t about filling a space on a team that happens to be hiring; this is about devoting part of your career to a company. You need to ensure that your goals and aspirations meet the company’s. When this is the case, you have a better chance of sticking with the company for years to come, and they have a better shot of success because you’re just as devoted to the mission as the company.

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