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Researching a Company's Diversity Policies

Researching a Company's Diversity Policies

What to look for when researching a company's diversity policies.

By Therese Droste, Career Coach at Monster.com

June 05, 2007

The interview’s set. Now you want to know if the potential employer does more than talk about diversity. Follow these tips to find out if the company has a proven commitment to hiring a wide range of people.

Making the Grade

Many business and special-interest publications compile regular lists of employers that back up their diversity efforts with proven results. Forbes magazine publishes an annual list of businesses noted for their diversity policies. “Such publicity gives you some clue into the company,” says diversity expert Joyce Moy, director of Workforce Strategies Center in New York.

What’s the Buzz?

“Listen to what your community is saying about an employer,” Moy says. Don’t underestimate the power of these grapevines. They are valuable tools to learn about potential employers from people with unique perspectives.

Look the Company in the Face

“The biggest and best indication is a company’s public face,” says Luke Visconti, president of Allegiant Media of New Brunswick, New Jersey, which publishes DiversityInc.com, a Web site that features diversity news and tips. “Look at its Web site and closely evaluate the diversity areas on it,” he says. “Also view the company’s advertising to see if it reflects the values you’d want to represent.”

Also, find out how the company gives back to the community. Research the company’s diversity-related events, mentoring or scholarship programs it sponsors.

On Campus?

Does the employer have a presence on college campuses where minority groups are well-represented? If so, it’s a good indication the company is serious about recruiting minorities.

Check the Bottom Line

Investigate whether a company ties diversity to its business success. That concept requires more than just sponsoring events to support social issues. It means a company views serving diverse communities as a comprehensive business advantage. Feel free to ask what a company is doing to contribute to the field of diversity.

“Overall, you want to work for a company that understands the needs of various groups,” Visconti says.

This article has been reprinted from Monster, the Internet’s leading job board.


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