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Types of Interviews

Types of Interviews

Conquer your job interviewing fears by exploring the types of interviews first.

By Roxana Hadad

March 16, 2009

An interview is an interview, right? Actually, depending on the size of the company, you could go through many interviews before the decision is made. Ace each one by knowing what to expect.

Screening Interview

Usually a member of the personnel department or an outside recruiter conducts this interview, which is meant to weed out unqualified candidates. This interview is often done over the phone. It focuses on clarifying and confirming the qualifications on your resume.

Initial Interview

The initial interview is conducted by someone from the human resources department. They figure out if you fit the job description and can do the job. They will then determine whether to pass you on to the hiring manager.

Selection Interview

This consists of a more in-depth interview and is conducted by the hiring manager. It’s used to explore your skills and experience. There might be more than one selection interview with various people from different departments or levels to determine your fit with the organization.

Follow-up Interview

There may be one or more additional meetings after the selection interview. They provide an opportunity for the employer to get more details on the information that was gathered in an earlier interview. Your follow-up interview might seem like a casual conversation, but it’s very important to the final selection.

Committee Interview

In a committee interview, you face a panel of several members of a company. You may be asked to demonstrate your problem-solving skills by thinking through a hypothetical business situation or dilemma. You don’t have to come up with the perfect solution: They’re more interested in how you apply your skills and knowledge to a real-world situation.

Group Interview

A group interview is usually designed to find leadership potential and employees who will be dealing with the public. Job candidates are brought together in an informal, discussion-type interview. A topic is introduced and the interviewer starts off the discussion. The goal of the group interview is to evaluate your leadership skills and how you interact with others.

The interview process can be exhausting and nerve-wracking. But if you know what to expect at your next interview, you’ll be in control and on your way to a new job.


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