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My Internship at 32nd Signal Army Batallion

My Internship at 32nd Signal Army Batallion

Check out a student's first hand account of my internship at 32nd Signal Army Batallion.

March 12, 2009

Student: Candace Voegele
Internship: 32nd Signal Battalion, Army
How I heard about it: I found out about this leadership training through my ROTC department instructors. It is called Cadet Troop Leadership Training. It is a chance to intern in an Army unit and learn firsthand about the demands of an Army officer.

Daily routine

Each day began with my alarm ringing at 5:15 a.m. I was in the office by 6:00 a.m. Physical training took place from approximately 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. I then had an hour and a half to clean up and eat breakfast. At 9:00 a.m., first formation was held in the company area and guidance was given to the soldiers on their tasks for the day.

For one week, our platoon attended a field training exercise. Each day here was somewhat different. Shifts were set because monitors had to be up at all times. As a platoon leader, I pulled day shifts from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Activities consisted of site inspections, equipment inspections, and soldier training.

What I got out of it

I learned many things during this internship. One of the most important was about enlisted soldier/officer relations. Enlisted personnel have different views of officers. After talking to them, I [realized] the things I don’t want to do as an officer. I also learned that being an officer takes many skills involving computers. In both the garrison and in the field, most of the communications equipment is computerized. You must also have great interpersonal skills. An officer has to communicate with many different people in order to get tasks accomplished. As an officer, you must know how to effectively use your subordinate leaders.

Word to the wise

Just get in there. Don’t wait for someone to tell you to do something. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes. That’s how you learn the most.


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